CASA Consultation Hub

The Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) is committed to working cooperatively with the aviation industry and community to maintain and enhance aviation safety. This hub is a place for you to find and participate in consultations that interest you.

Recently updated consultations are displayed below. Alternatively, search for consultations by keyword and interests.

 

We Asked, You Said, We Did

Here are some of the issues we have consulted on and their outcomes. See all outcomes

We Asked

In May 2019, we asked people to answer some questions regarding an airspace change proposal (ACP) to trial the lowering of Class E airspace to 5,500 feet above mean sea level (AMSL) over Ayers Rock Aerodrome. Notification of the consultation process included:

  • an email sent to all pilots at the start of the consultation period and a reminder email was sent prior to the consultation period closing (approx. 40,000 pilots)
  • CASA Briefing newsletter (May 2019) – reached approx. 7,000 subscribers
  • being promoted via a link on the CASA home page (www.casa.gov.au) during the consultation period
  • an email to advise all RAPAC members (641 individuals and organisations) that consultation had opened, and the proposal was placed on the agenda at RAPAC meetings held during the consultation period
  • being promoted via CASA’s social media channels.

Consultation through CASA’s website was open for 30 days and was also available to all members of the public. Respondents included aircraft operators and airspace users, air traffic controllers and other interested persons. The process sought responses to questions which related to the background of the respondent, the nature of their operations, the impact of the change on them and their opinions on cost and safety impacts of the change.

You Said

A total of 27 respondents provided feedback to this proposal through CASA’s Consultation Hub. One written submission was received by email and not via the Consultation Hub.

Of the responses received 10 supported the proposal; 11 did not support the proposal, six were supportive but with changes (in design or altitude); one did not answer.

We Did

Feedback from the consultation hub was considered and assessed as part of the ACP process.

The proposal was submitted in response to the Minister for Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development (DIRD) - Statement of Expectations 2018-2019, which stated that ‘Airservices will work with DIRD, Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) and Defence to provide options for enhancing the level of safety and efficiency of Australian controlled airspace including at major regional airports’. Non towered locations such as Ayers Rock have surveillance capability to the ground. An enhanced level of service along with segregated departure and arrival tracks could be provided to IFR aircraft, commensurate with the level of electronic surveillance.

In response to public comments, the final airspace design was reduced to lessen the impact on visual flight rules pilots and still be beneficial to instrument flight rules aircraft. The trial of Class E airspace in the vicinity of Ayers Rock Aerodrome will commence on 20 May 2020.

We Asked

In May 2019, we asked people to answer some questions regarding an airspace change proposal (ACP) lower Class E airspace to Flight Level (FL) 125 where the current base is FL180. Notification of the consultation process included:

  • an email sent to all pilots at the start of the consultation period and a reminder email was sent prior to the consultation period closing (approx. 40,000 pilots)
  • CASA Briefing newsletter (May 2019) – reached approx. 7,000 subscribers
  • being promoted via a link on the CASA home page (www.casa.gov.au) during the consultation period
  • an email to advise all RAPAC members (641 individuals and organisations) that consultation had opened, and the proposal was placed on the agenda at RAPAC meetings held during the consultation period
  • being promoted via CASA’s social media channels.

Consultation through CASA’s website was open for 30 days and was also available to all members of the public. Respondents included aircraft operators and airspace users, air traffic controllers and other interested persons. The process sought responses to questions which related to the background of the respondent, the nature of their operations, the impact of the change on them and their opinions on cost and safety impacts of the change.

You Said

A total of 77 respondents provided feedback to this proposal through the Consultation Hub. The majority of the responses received were airspace users (41), followed by other (17) with six air traffic controllers responding. One additional written submission was received by email and not via the Consultation Hub. Overall, 39 supported the change; 29 did not support the proposal and nine were supportive but with changes.

Two respondents provided a written response in addition to their submission through the Consultation Hub. One additional written submission was received by email and not via the Consultation Hub.

We Did

Feedback from the consultation hub was considered and assessed as part of the ACP process.

An improvement in surveillance capability due to the installation of Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADS-B) receivers nation-wide will provide benefits to airspace users. To realise these benefits, Airservices proposed to lower the base of Class E airspace over low density continental areas to F125 where it is currently FL180.

The lowering of Class E airspace to FL125 will commence on 20 May 2020.

We Asked

From 18 December 2018 to 31 January 2019 we invited public comment on our proposal to set a new minimum safety standard for community service flights (CSF). The consultation asked you to comment on a draft legislative instrument that would apply additional safety requirements for the conduct of CSF and included 16 provisions that related to licensing and medical requirements for pilots; minimum CSF pilot experience; a requirement that flights at night be conducted under the instrument flight rules (IFR); and maintenance-related enhancements intended to align with requirements governing similar operations in Australia.

You Said

CASA appreciates the contributions made by respondents and acknowledges that their feedback has been beneficial to the consultation process. The consultation received responses from 233 individuals or organisations—including 115 people who said they were a pilot who had flown a CSF. Responses were evenly split between a group of respondents that did not support any element of the proposal and a combined group of those respondents that partially or fully supported the proposal. Consultation feedback highlighted that some elements of the proposal were disproportionately costly compared to their safety benefits. A detailed analysis of the feedback in provided in the Summary of Consultation (published below).

We Did

In response to the consultation, CASA has modified the new minimum standard to provide appropriate safety protections to CSF passengers at a significantly reduced cost compared to the initial proposal.

Key changes are:

  • Specific engine maintenance requirements have been removed.
  • Factory-built light sport aircraft registered under Part 47 of CASR may be used.
  • The definition of CSF has been refined to provide that the pilot and passengers are introduced through a charitable or community service organisation, and the passengers are not charged for the flight.
  • The PPL multi-engine 100-hour experience requirement has been reduced to 25 hours and applied to all pilots.
  • The flight notification requirement has been clarified to be a full flight details or SARTIME notification with a remark stating the flight is a CSF operation.

The requirements will come into effect on 19 March 2019.

Further information about the new requirements for CSF is published on the CASA website.